Students

OUR STUDENTS



 


Angela Bruno
PhD Student


Andrew Scheyer
PhD Student

Flexible ensemble structure is an inherent feature of many neural circuits, and we speculate that aberrations of ensemble dynamics may contribute to pathology in neurological and psychiatric disease.  To better understand flexible ensemble structure, I investigate the moment to moment changes in neural network organization that occur during both normal behavior and learning in a simple model preparation.

My research focuses on the electrophysiological consequences of cocaine withdrawal in the nucleus accumbens.  Currently, I am investigating the changes associated with the homeostatic regulation of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors in medium-spiny neurons, and the implications this may have on glutamatergic transmission in drug-reward circuitry.


Craig Werner
PhD Student


Stanley Bazarek
MD/PhD Student

I am interested in investigating the role of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) in the regulation of glutamate receptor transmission following exposure to drugs of abuse.  My work focuses primarily on the nucleus accumbens, an area known to be important in addiction, with the use of molecular and biochemical techniques. 

The focus of my research is to identify and recruit endogenous stem/progenitor cells from non-neurogenic regions of the brain
parenchyma and direct their differentiation to a neuronal fate using viral gene delivery of various growth and
transcription factors for the purpose of regeneration and repair. 

 

 


Anthony Purgianto
MD/PhD Student


Soumyabrata Munshi
PhD Student

 

My research interest is in the neurobiology of drug addiction.  Drugs of abuse cause a great burden to society, and we still do not have a complete understanding how they are causing an addicted state.  I will be using behavioral, molecular, and electrophysiological methods in order to explore neuronal pathways in the brain underlying addiction.  A specific aim of my study is to assess whether the main glutamate pathways into the nucleus accumbens are more or less efficacious in activating nucleus accumbens neurons after cocaine self-administration.

I am presently performing my Ph.D. dissertation works in Neuroscience and Neuropharmacology under the "Interdepartmental Neuroscience Ph.D. Program (IDNP)."  My work is focused on exploring the effects of immune system activation and stress on amygdala physiology and amygdala-dependent behavior in rats. 

 

 

Interdepartmental PhD Program Graduates

May, 2012 
May, 2012 
May, 2012 
Dec, 2011 
Dec, 2011   
Nov, 2011
June, 2011 
May, 2011
June, 2010
June, 2010
June, 2010 
July, 2009
May, 2009 
May, 2008
Apr, 2008 
Aug, 2007
June, 2007 
June, 2005   
May, 2005   
Apr, 2005 
Nov, 2004
May, 2003
Apr, 2002
Feb, 2002
Jan, 2002
Aug, 2001  
Apr, 2000 
Jan, 2000
May, 1999  
May, 1999 
Sept, 1998  
June, 1998 
May, 1998
 
Xuan (Anna) Li
Xiaoting Wang
Daniel Hafez
Laura Shin
Jeffrey Huang
Dina Simkin
Shreaya Chakroborty
Randy Leitermann
Giovanna Bernal
Alexander Dec
Jeremy Reimers
Diana Park
Kristina Hoque
Amana Rostkowski
Kelly Conrad
Tamuna Chadashvili
Amy Boudreau
Rosanne Thomas
Anna Hallbergson
Eleanora Maries
Tara Teppen
Kyriaki Sidiropoulou
Gregory Hotsenpiller
Yang Dong
Jayms Peterson
Steven Chao
Donald Cooper
Timothy Koetzlow
Elizabeth Bundock
Lara Friel
Lisa Monteggia
Yong Li
Christy Stine

 


Life in Discovery
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